FAQ

WHAT IS CBD?


IS CBD LEGAL?

Yes! Per the 2018 Farm Bill, CBD is completely legal, as is hemp in general. Hemp is distinguished by its low THC content (not to exceed 0.3% THC), which is the compound in marijuana known for offering its users a “high.”



I”VE NEVER TRIED CBD BEFORE.  HOW SHOULD I GET STARTED?

If you have no specific mental and physical performance goals, a good place to start is with a 5280 Hemp Supply CBD isolate. CBD Isolates can be used at any time of day, though it’s easiest to work into your routine if you use it first thing in the morning. Try to use it consistently for at least a week and keep track of your overall performance and sense of well-being. After a week, try adding a second serving of 5280 Hemp Supply CBD Isolate in the afternoon or in the evening. You’ll begin to get a sense of how 5280 Hemp Supply CBD Isolate works into your routine and how the benefits of hemp are playing out in your day-to-day life.

If you feel comfortable starting a hemp routine that also targets just-right energy regulation, consider using CBD in the morning and at night.  As noted before, it might be helpful to keep track of how you’re feeling each day, then look back at your notes after a week or two to get a sense of how 5280 Hemp Supply CBD is helping you raise your baseline feeling of week bring. Every day is a new day with a new set of highs and lows. Though 5280 CBD products won’t eliminate life’s challenges, they are designed to help make it easier for you to rise to those challenges, both mentally and physically!

WILL CBD GET ME HIGH?

No. Hemp CBD Isolate products contain zero THC and Full-Spectrum Hemp products contain 0.3% or less THC, which is verified through third-party testing of each product batch and documented in a Certificate of Analysis (CoA). Track any product batch to view its CoA.


WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN FULL SPECTRUM HEMP AND CBD ISOLATE?

You may be wondering: Hemp vs CBD - and what’s the difference? Hemp CBD Isolate products are water-soluble (and maximally bioavailable) and contain only the cannabinoid Cannabidiol (CBD). Full-Spectrum Hemp products contain water-soluble hemp with its full range of 113 cannabinoids, which includes a trace level of THC.


CAN I BUILD UP A TOLERANCE TO CBD? 

No. You cannot.


WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN INDICA AND SATIVA?


WHAT IS THE FARM BILL?

In 2018, the US government enacted the Farm Bill, which established a legal distinction between hemp and marijuana and federally legalized hemp cultivation and sales. The Farm Bill defines hemp as containing not more than 0.3% of THC, the cannabinoid commonly known for producing a “high”. While hemp had long been an agricultural staple, it was essentially made illegal through the 1937 Marijuana Tax Act, then formally banned by the Controlled Substances Act of 1970.


HOW ::company name:: MAINTAINS COMPLIANCE WITH FEDERAL & STATE LAWS

Federal law continues to evolve concerning CBD products and many states have strict laws that regulate the purity and safety of cannabis products. Flav maintains a rigorous schedule of testing to ensure our CBD products meet and exceed state and federal standards.


LAWS THAT ::company name:: COMPLIES WITH

The Agricultural Act of 2014

Section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014, commonly referred to as the Farm Bill, regulates cannabis cultivation and research. Section 7606, titled “Legitimacy of Industrial Hemp Research,” regulates the cultivation and processing of hemp and hemp-derived products. Section 7606 has two conditions which must be met for the growth of hemp to be legal under federal law:

  1. “The industrial hemp is grown or cultivated for purposes of research conducted under an agricultural pilot program or other agricultural or academic research; and
  2. The growing or cultivating of industrial hemp is allowed under the laws of the State in which such institution of higher education or State department of agriculture is located and such research occurs.”

The Farm Bill does make an exception to the legal definition of marijuana as it relates to industrial hemp. Industrial hemp is defined as, “the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a [THC] concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.” This exception means that any cannabis with less than 0.3% THC by weight is not considered a controlled substance by the federal government.

The Controlled Substances Act of 1970

This drug policy allows the federal government to determine what substances constitute a risk to public health and to regulate them appropriately. Marijuana is a Schedule 1 controlled substance. This means that the federal government considers marijuana to have “no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.” Under the Schedule 1 designation for marijuana, THC is described as the component responsible for marijuana’s classification as a controlled substance. However, cannabis containing 0.3% or less THC by volume is not considered by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be a controlled substance. In May of 2018, the DEA reiterated that “the mere presence of cannabinoids” does not constitute a controlled substance.

Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016

Section 763 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016, commonly referred to as the Omnibus Appropriations Act, determined how federal money can be used in marijuana law enforcement. Section 763 of the 2016 funding bill prohibits the federal government from spending federal dollars “to prohibit the transportation, processing, sale, or use of industrial hemp that is grown or cultivated in accordance with Section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014, within or outside the State in which the industrial hemp is grown or cultivated.”

This effectively prohibits the federal government from spending any federal funds to prosecute individuals involved in any cannabis-related activities under the regulation of Section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014.

THE LEGAL DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HEMP & CANNABIS

The federal government considers a cannabis plant to be hemp when it contains 0.3% or less THC by volume.

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT CANNABIS

While slightly controversial, it is still generally accepted that there are three species of cannabis: Indica, Sativa, and Ruderalis. Indica grows short in stature with broad leaves. It is known for having sedating and relaxing effects on the body. Some forms of Indica are selectively bred to have very low THC content so they can be classified as hemp to produce CBD products. Sativa grows tall in stature with thin leaves. It is known for having uplifting, mostly cerebral effects. Ruderalis is a short and stalky variety that produces almost no flowering tops. Indica and Sativa species are both widely used for cannabis products.

The statements regarding these products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Results from products may vary.

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